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Lackawaxen Lake

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The trail to Lackawaxen Lake is filled with wildflowers or golden aspens and allows dogs. It is near Guardsman Pass, between Park City and Big Cottonwood Canyon and can be easily combined with Blood’s Lake (but Bloods Lake doesn’t allow dogs).

The parking lot is the same as for Bloods Lake and is across the street from the trail. There are a couple different ways to get there and I’ll go over a few different routes.

Trail to Bloods Lake and Lake Lackawaxen

The first route I will explain is if you want to go to both lakes. I recommend this if you can!

If you have a dog to go to within 0.2 mile of Blood’s Lake and then bypass it to continue to Lake Laxawaxen.

This is also the shortest route and has slightly less elevation changes. This trail is well-marked with signs, so you’ll head right along this nice path through the aspens and pine trees.

There are stone benches periodically with great quotes where you can stop to rest or take in the view.

The wildflowers in this area are spectacular, especially in July and August.

The path is fairly level for the first mile and then steeper as you go through the pines ascending near Bloods Lake.

When you get to top of the hill of switchbacks, then there is another sign that says no dogs can continue the last little part to Bloods Lake. There is a nice path to the left that heads towards Lackawaxen Lake along the Lackasomethin Trail, explained farther below.

Bloods Lake

The photo above shows Bloods Lake as you first see it. It is nice, but I highly recommend walking around the lake clockwise to the opposite side. The lake looks so much prettier, since it can reflect the sky that direction.

If you have the AllTrails map downloaded, it recommends a weird way to continue to Lake Lackawaxen, but just follow the posted signs that direct you up the hill in the top right corner of the above photos. The path switchbacks higher and you can see Bloods Lake below you through the trees. When you get higher you meet back up with the alternate path for dogs.

The path continues uphill through the pines and then across some boulders.

Then the path levels out for a bit with a meadow. The mountain you can see in the first photo, off to the right is Clayton Peak. The other side of it is Brighton Ski Resort, near the Great Western Express ski lift.

Clayton Peak Trail

You can climb Clayton Peak from this trail with only an added half mile, but it’s pretty steep. We were a little pressed for time, so we just went up a little bit to see the views. The first shows the trail we took up to get the view and is the same trail you would continue to get to the peak which is behind and not visible in the photo. The second photo shows some of the wonderful views.

The views towards Park City are incredible!

Clayton Peak Trail

Do you see the path in this last photo, that is the path to Lackawaxen, so you don’t have to take this detour. After the meadow there is another little boulder field and then you can see the lake through the trees.

Lake Lackawaxen

Lake Laxawaxen allows dogs and is a pretty lake right at the base of Clayton Peak.

Other Connecting Trails

Here is a map so you can understand the alternate trails and where you could potentially take them. Most of this system is dog-friendly, but Bloods Lake is close enough to Big Cottonwood Canyon to be a watershed. The main trail I described above is in red on the map.

Kalamazoo Trail

The Kalamazoo Trail is very nice through the aspens and wildflowers, but has quite a bit of elevation change. The north side near the parking lot is much higher, so if you take that way then at some point you’ll have to get back up the hill. Bloods Lake and Lake Lackawaxen are even higher elevation so going downhill is scenic, but more effort. We took this path on our way back to the car, so we were going uphill.

Loopine Trail

The Loopine Trail does have lots of beautiful lupine flowers and a meadow. Most of this trail is at the lower elevation. The main trail to Bloods Lake goes through those trees up above. Most of the other trails are pretty shaded, but the Loopine Trail is mostly sunny.

Lackasomethin Trail

The Lackasomethin Trail connects the Bloods Lake Trail from right before the lake to continue to Lackawaxen without bypassing the lake, which you would do if you had a dog with you. These are the two junctions.

And here is a view looking down on the trail. We didn’t actually hike the little section back to Blood’s Lake since we were already making a big loop on all the other trails.

The other section of Lackawaxen has more amazing wildflowers, views, and then pines.

Stats to Bloods Lake:

Distance – 2.8 miles round trip 
Approximate hiking time – 2-3 hours
Elevation gain – 465 feet                            Difficulty – Moderate
Trail – well maintained trail of dirt and rocks
Bathrooms – At trailhead
Seasons to hike – May -October
Permits needed – None
Pets allowed – Partially (not at the lake, but most of the rest)

Stats to Lake Lackawaxen:

Distance – 4.6 miles round trip 
Approximate hiking time – 2-4 hours
Elevation gain – 1158 feet                          Difficulty – Moderate
Trail – well maintained trail of dirt and rocks
Bathrooms – At trailhead
Seasons to hike – May -October
Permits needed – None
Pets allowed – Partially (not at the lake, but most of the rest)

Stats of Kalamazoo Trail:

Distance – 0.3 miles one way 
Approximate hiking time – 10-30 minutes
Elevation gain – 214 feet                            Difficulty – Moderate
Trail – well maintained trail of dirt and rocks
Bathrooms – At trailhead
Seasons to hike – May -October
Permits needed – None
Pets allowed – Yes

Stats of Loopine Trail:

Distance – 1.0 mile one way 
Approximate hiking time – 15-60 minutes
Elevation gain – 468 feet                            Difficulty – Moderate
Trail – well maintained trail of dirt and rocks
Bathrooms – At trailhead
Seasons to hike – May -October
Permits needed – None
Pets allowed – Yes

Stats of Lackasomethin Trail:

Distance – 0.3 mile one way
Approximate hiking time – 10-30 minutes
Elevation gain – 197 feet                            Difficulty – Moderate
Trail – well maintained trail of dirt and rocks
Bathrooms – At trailhead
Seasons to hike – May -October
Permits needed – None
Pets allowed – Yes

utahhikingbeauty

We have so much beauty in Utah to explore! I love hiking and photography and can help you find your next favorite hike! All photos were taken by me!

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